sketch

APR // Monthly Update

Well it was a busy month (what else is new)

I managed a sketch but no readings! A lot happening on site, a lot to learn from.

test_010_sketch

The next step with this project beyond these little tests is to further the research. Perhaps this needs to be in the form of design still, as that is where my skills are at the moment. Development is a further path down the road. What would a comprehensive yet minimal UI look like for this?

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muse, sketch

FEB // monthly update

Hey there end of February.

I’ll admit, I’m failing at keeping a schedule. It’s been hard to will myself to work on the next test. It’s been hard to make time for brainstorming interface ideas. It’s been hard just keeping up with a side project. No surprise. I’ve tried reading motivational, productivity, inspiring medium writing. They’re good, and they’re helpful, but sometimes an over-saturation of it starts to do the opposite — feels even more overwhelming. Sometimes you just gotta do it!

Thankfully, things are moving forward on site, which means I may just progress with my site series. It’ll be a little late, but it’s on it’s way!

Here’s a sketch of the next site series — steel is here!

sketch 009

Links ahead:

  1. Freddy Mamani’s New Andean Architecture adds colour to Bolivian city
    This is pretty amazing. It’s trippy as heck, but colourful and unique. I don’t know how this style of work will fare around the world, because it’s very bold, but the splashes of colour and fantastical geometric forms can certainly brighten up the street. I’m now wondering how my Artifact app idea can bring more of these unique designs to the surface. I guess there could be a global search function that highlights certain styles of details? Colour perhaps? Architizer probably has a good system for that.
  2. How the Internet of Things (IoT) is Changing Modern Office Design
    More on the Internet of things. Office design is really fascinating to me, somehow.

    “It is embedded in everyday objects we use and allows them to communicate autonomously with each other.”

    What if they’re communicating to us through a digital overlay of information? The article discusses the use of VR to enhance communication between coworkers, customers, etc. On the flip side of such an integrated work experience, will this be the end of work-life balance? Probably more to be said about that model in another discussion.

  3. The healthy Architect or how to master Stress in Architecture
    An older article but a good read to refresh our mindset of how to work successfully, productively and also balanced.

    “Stress as part of the profession or part of the culture?”

    This is a long and loaded one. But a lot of the pointers are very standard and practical advice. Sometimes you just really get into a project, or a problem to solve and consume-ing-ly (not a word) hack at it non-stop. And sometimes you go at it too long and burn out. I’m no stranger to this cycle. So what’s better, this extreme ends cycle or a seemingly less stressful series of habits to approach ‘balance’ from a different perspective? Honestly I’m not sure. I think both could be viable solutions, and really it pends on so many factors. Including a considerable amount of self-control, understanding of one-self’s capabilities and limitations, as well as knowing one’s threshold of fun and active. What’s your way?

 

I’ve been testing out development on android this past month. Started with something very simple like a sticker pack using a template Android Studio package. But it worked and at the very least I can say I have officially joined the Android development world. Next steps for this app may be a lot more complicated, especially without a concrete idea. So more brainstorming to come.

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muse, sketch

JAN // Monthly Update

Hello January. Rather, See Ya January!

It’s the new year, which means ARtifact Lab was on my new years resolutions to keep hacking at. The site series may take a one-test break for an insert test while real-life progress on site gets ready for steel. That being said, here’s some sketches for Test 009 ideas: Last October, I went to check out the local but temporary BIG Serpentine pavilion, here in Toronto to promote Bijarke’s new ‘Habitat’-esque proliferation of housing units across King West. The project is pretty neat, even though it’s quite insane. I also checked out a talk including Bjarke himself, the head of Westbank development, as well as artist Douglas Coupland, longtime friend and collaborator of the two.

I did a pretty early sketch of a simplified test version for the towers back in October, but here’s an update:sketch 009

I have some plans for more interface design options for the coming months in addition to the ongoing Tests. Looking exciting.

In the meantime, here are some links! Only two this week and both from Redshift, which I have been following more regularly.

  1. IoT Technology Will Improve Safety and Efficiency on the Construction Site
    IoT stands for ‘Internet of Things’ — a blanket term that encompasses a number of web-enabled smart tech. The things they can do are pretty neat, I would love to be part of this kind of development.

    “Just like the smart watch senses your daily activities and gives you insights into when you should walk, meditate, or drink a glass of water, IoT on construction sites are also identifying risks before they happen. “

  1. 5 Things the Built World Can Learn From a Filmmaker’s Digital Pipeline
    I was in the entertainment industry for a really brief while, on the computer animation front rather than film making. I think they’re wildly different, but seeing the word ‘pipeline’ sorta strikes at some nostalgia for sure. This one isn’t a long read, worth running through! #3 is so true.

    “The same holds true in the built world, where more refined real-time visualizations and actions can allow decisions to be made earlier and prevent the time-and-cost ramifications of delays.”

That’s all for now, bye!

 

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muse, sketch

NOV // Monthly Progress

At the rate I have been reading, learning, sketching and producing, I think it is safe to assume that I have been able to push out a test once a month. It is probably a good benchmark for me as I am. Now this is the point where I realize weekly has become bi-weekly and then bi-weekly has become monthly. And eventually the project fizzles into the dust of an alternate universe. But, I think monthly is actually totally achievable. It gives me time to learn in my job (for the site series tests), read enough interesting buzz to reflect about, sketch my next ideas, and of course, produce a test.

So how goes this monthly? Test 007 came out smoothly and was well received on instagram. Probably the best place to follow for just my test progress, whereas my text updates will happen here on the blog. It will come in two parts, the first will be test sketches as well as interesting articles or ideas that have come up. And the second part will be the actual test. I guess…that means I’m back to bi-weekly. 🙃

Here’s a collection of interesting AR stories I’ve read recently (actual article of course, may not be too recent)

“… but really any time you’re working on new stuff the goal should be for the radical new technology to basically just disappear, to be invisible to the user.”

  • Nike’s new NYC flagship store is fueled by its mobile app
    There were a slew of these articles released the past few months about Nike’s new retail stint. It’s pretty darn cool, I’d definitely be down to check it out. Retail ain’t dying yet, not on Nike’s watch.

  • Opendesk launches augmented-reality shopping for its open-source furniture
    Speaking of AR in retail, here’s another one closer to home (haha…) I Like this idea, and I’ve tried it unsuccessfully with the ikea app earlier this year when I got my (now outdated) ipad. With the new ARKit2 opportunities though, there’s just so much possibility.
  • Think Generative Design Is Overhyped? These Examples Could Change Your Mind
    I’ve linked and mused about a Redshift article before. Here’s another one that caught my eye. There is some controversy regarding generative design to replace space making (and from the designer’s perspective, it could be a scary thought — what use am I now?), but what about if we shifted that perspective to understand generative design as a partner to design? We’re not getting replaced, we’re just getting actively and exponentially assisted in ways we never could have imagined just a few years ago. I remember walking through Autodesk’s new Toronto office, and there was a little display talking about how generative design is helping with boeing aircraft design to not only increase the strength of the shell, but also reduce weight, reduce waste, reduce fuel needed. Just so many things.  That made me incredibly excited.

I’ll finish off with sketches for Test 008. Somehow it looks like I’ve caught up to construction progress. Perhaps the next test will be a break and I will intercede with some recent event tests. Moving on up
sketch 008

 

 

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muse, test

a test 001

My thoughts have all just been mindlessly floating around in my brainspace without getting churned or developed to maturity – whether it’s is a mature dead end or a mature launching point. And so, this rolling journal is here to take on many forms and stages throughout the lifespan of the project.

At this nascent stage, this is an incubator for ideas. Thoughts; Challenges; SWOT analysis; Writing (but actually mostly in the form of the sketch below) As I learn, I will iterate. It is
highly possible the project will take many pivot points before reaching a state of stability, and even then, it has to grow. I want to also document any attempts at frontend development I may have. Further along, you may even see some working demos.

A bit more on ‘a test – 001’ (pretentious, implying I have 999 more exercises to attempt)

A test 001 —
1 UNIT: built space
OCCUPANCY: public/semi-private
TYPE(s): urban infrastructure, landscape, architecture
AR/TIFACT(s): 06

IDEAS: xx

I start with one unit of built space the idea to take place. What if, wherever you are, let’s say you enter this unit of built space, you have access to a whole new layer of information and media. It is not quite physical space and it is not quite virtual space. It is both in my mind – that’s what makes AR so interesting. Have you ever used Waze when driving? I think that would be a neat experience, at the scale of a pedestrian, to interact with your surroundings and having access to a database of information about all the things that are constructed around you.

I have more ideas to expand here for sure. But something to think about for now.

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